Tag Archives: science

Artificial Dyes linked to Hyperactivity

Standard

This is taken from a petition I received in my mail.  To sign the petition, click here

I could add my own comments here… but this lady has worded it well.  I would only add that it’s not just candies we need to be concerned with, but any food (and there are many) that these items are used in.  I’ve seen Yellow 5, Yellow 6 and Red 40 in several different things, and it’s adversely affecting our kids.  Even if your child has not received an ADD/ADHD diagnosis, it could still be causing behavioral problems of a sort… and it is something that our children do NOT need to have in their diets.  Interestingly… in Europe, they actually put WARNINGS if these dyes are used in food!  Why can’t we in the US do the same…? *sigh* good ole FDA, always watching our backs…. :/   Here is her text in its entirety, you can click on the link above or on the bottom below her post.  It is definitely worth a read… here it is:

“Did you know that M&M’s candies contain harmful, petroleum-based, artificial dyes that can trigger hyperactivity in sensitive children? I believe eliminating these dyes did wonders for my family’s health. M&M’s are already made without most of those dyes in Europe so I don’t understand why they are being made with cheaper, controversial ingredients in North America? Please sign my petition asking for M&M’s to be made without artificial dyes.

I’m a mom to two kids, and we like having some sweets around the house like most people do. Several years ago our little Trenton (now 9 years old) was having some behavioral problems. He was having trouble in school, at hockey practice, and at home with tasks as basic as falling asleep. He’d often have nightmares, and the slightest disappointment would set him off. As I did some research, I found out that parents all across the country have been struggling with similar hyperactivity issues. I also found out that many families were using an “elimination diet” to isolate and remove harmful ingredients — particularly artificial dyes. By removing dyes like those found in M&M’s, they were able to delay, reduce, and sometimes eliminate the need for medication.

Some of the latest info from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that more than 1 out of every 10 school-aged child has received a medical diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder! My understanding is that’s a 41% percent increase in the past decade, and that’s why I’m so interested in trying to find simple solutions that will help make our families healthier.

I’m not trying to keep my kids from being kids.  They can have treats.  But they don’t need petroleum-based dyes.

Just two days after deciding to eliminate artificial dyes from Trenton’s diet, we saw dramatic improvements! His nightmares stopped and he was able to sleep through the night. Trent changed from a child who would have a meltdown if he didn’t get his way during playtime to a calm student who could share and do his schoolwork. When Trenton returned to hockey camp, the coach couldn’t believe he was the same person, calling him “smiling, eager to participate, and a joy to have on the ice.” Trenton’s teachers and coaches all know him for his sense of humor, wit and contagious positive attitude. Trenton excels in academics and sports, and this has been possible since our family figured out the harmful effects of the dyes.

We did this without medication and by eliminating harmful dyes like the Yellow 5, Yellow 6, and Red 40 found in M&M’s. When M&M’s are sold in Europe, different dyes are used because otherwise they’d be required by law to place a label on the packaging that says “may have an adverse effect on activity and attention in children.”

With Halloween coming up, I’ve decided to work with the experts at the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) on this campaign. Their review of scientific studies shows that artificial dyes including Yellow 5, Yellow 6, and Red 40 can stimulate hyperactivity and other behavior problems in children.  CSPI has recommended that these additives be prohibited from use in foods. I was present at a 2011 hearing where even the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acknowledged that “Exposure to food and food components, including artificial food colors and preservatives, may be associated with adverse behaviors” in children.

M&M’s used to be one of Trenton’s favorite candies, but we’ve found products in the United States like SunDrops, Yummy Gummies, and Unreal that don’t use these dyes. And they taste great! I don’t believe anyone should be eating cheap, harmful, unnecessary dyes when safer alternatives exist and already are used in M&M’s in Europe! Please join us in asking Mars Inc., manufacturer of M&M’s, to replace artificial dyes with natural coloring.”

https://www.change.org/petitions/m-m-s-candies-stop-using-artificial-dyes-linked-to-hyperactivity#

Tracking bracelets due to flu… what???

Standard

I couldn’t believe my eyes when I read this today.  The full article is here:   http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2008/11/21/boston_launches_flu_shot_tracking/?page=2

Incidentally, these are RFID chip bracelets that we are discussing.

Interestingly H1N1 hadn’t occurred yet when this article was written in November of 2008 (at least as far as the general public knows).  Even more interesting is the fact this system was bought back in 2006 and was intended for catastrophe use… fires, floods, etc.

Below is an excerpt from the 2nd page of the article:

When people arrive for their shots, they will get an ID bracelet with a barcode.

Next, basic information -name, age, gender, address – will be entered into the patient tracking database.

There will be electronic records, too, of who gave the vaccine and whether it was injected into the right arm or the left, and time-stamped for that day.

Ultimately, city health authorities said, they envision creating a network across the city that would allow public and private providers of flu shots to add data to a registry.

Some will read this, shrug their shoulders and say… “So what?”  Others who are on the watch will read this and say… “Okay, here we go, hang on for the ride.”

Those in the latter group, feel free to share this info with your loved ones.  Those in the first group… well, don’t worry your head about it.

VIDEO… Testing 1, 2, 3

Standard

Warning:  The following video may contain upsetting or disturbing scenes for some viewers.  It is about animal testing.

Sign the Pledge Against Animal Testing

Hot Dogs Dangerous, Red Meats Can Increase Cancer Risk

Standard

I read the following article on Care2.com this morning.  Many of us already know this but it is worth reminding everyone.

On Wednesday, July 22, the Cancer Project, an affiliate of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), a nonprofit organization that advocates vegetarianism and alternatives to animal research, filed a class-action consumer fraud lawsuit to require hot dog manufacturers to place warning labels on hot dog packages sold in New Jersey. The labels would read, “Warning: Consuming hot dogs and other processed meats increases the risk of cancer.”

According to PCRM’s press release, the lawsuit was filed on behalf of three New Jersey residents who purchased hot dogs without knowing that processed meats contribute to colorectal cancer.

Studies show that there is conclusive link between meat consumption and colorectal cancer.

The American Cancer Society even warns, “A diet that is high in red meats (beef, lamb, or liver) and processed meats such as hot dogs, bologna, and lunch meat can increase your colorectal cancer risk.”

MSG in all the wrong places

Standard

Below is a list of where you can find (and thus avoid as much as possible) MSG, otherwise known as Monosodium Glutamate.  If you are unaware of the dangers of this DRUG (yes drug) then please see archives and categories for my posts on MSG.  Likewise you can google MSG and dangers and find TONS of info. Long story short, MSG causes drug reactions that mimic diseases and illnesses such as heart attack-like symptoms, arrhythmia and palpitations, panic attacks, weakness, partial paralysis, rashes, allergy symptoms, feelings of pressure in the chest, depression, behavioral problems, mood swings, neurological problems, and more… just to name a few.

WHY the FDA allows it…  I don’t know.  After you educate yourself on just how bad MSG is for people, the next step is to write the FDA and also the presidential administration, and ask them to stop a) allowing it and b) processing (and thus creating it in many forms) in our foods!  Some of it occurs naturally in things like tomatoes and soybeans, and this should be labeled appropriately as well.  The majority of it is created through processing of certain food items in the factory.  Yet others just use it like a seasoning (which it is NOT).  It is a DRUG and NEUROTRANSMITTER, used to trick the brain into thinking something lousy tastes better than it really is.  It creates addiction to certain carb-loaded foods and has been linked in various studies to OBESITY.  It is also used in Nutrasweet… and vaccines!

The following table is taken from this link: http://www.truthinlabeling.org/hiddensources.html

Hidden Names for MSG

The following substances contain the highest percentage

of factory created free glutamate, with MSG containing 78%:

WWW.truthinlabeling.orgHome page

Table of Contents


NAMES OF INGREDIENTS THAT CONTAIN ENOUGH MSG
TO SERVE AS COMMON MSG-REACTION TRIGGERS

The MSG-reaction is a reaction to free glutamic acid that occurs in food as a consequence of manufacture. MSG-sensitive people do not react to protein (which contains bound glutamic acid) or any of the minute amounts of free glutamic acid that might be found in unadulterated, unfermented, food.

These ALWAYS contain MSG
Glutamate Glutamic acid Gelatin
Monosodium glutamate Calcium caseinate Textured protein
Monopotassium glutamate Sodium caseinate Yeast nutrient
Yeast extract Yeast food Autolyzed yeast
Hydrolyzed protein
(any protein that is hydrolyzed)
Hydrolyzed corn gluten Natrium glutamate (natrium is Latin/German for sodium)
These OFTEN contain MSG or create MSG during processing
Carrageenan Maltodextrin Malt extract
Natural pork flavoring Citric acid Malt flavoring
Bouillon and Broth Natural chicken flavoring Soy protein isolate
Natural beef flavoring Ultra-pasteurized Soy sauce
Stock Barley malt Soy sauce extract
Whey protein concentrate Pectin Soy protein
Whey protein Protease Soy protein concentrate
Whey protein isolate Protease enzymes Anything protein fortified
Flavors(s) & Flavoring(s) Anything enzyme modified Anything fermented
Natural flavor(s)
& flavoring(s)
Enzymes anything Seasonings
(the word “seasonings”)

IN ADDITION

The not so new game is to label hydrolyzed proteins as pea protein, whey protein, corn protein, etc. If a pea, for example, were whole, it would be identified as a pea. Calling an ingredient pea protein indicates that the pea has been hydrolyzed, at least in part, and that processed free glutamic acid (MSG) is present. Relatively new to the list are wheat protein and soy protein.

Disodium guanylate and disodium inosinate are expensive food additives that work synergistically with inexpensive MSG. Their use suggests that the product has MSG in it. They would probably not be used as food additives if there were no MSG present.

MSG reactions have been reported to soaps, shampoos, hair conditioners, and cosmetics, where MSG is hidden in ingredients that include the words “hydrolyzed,” “amino acids,” and “protein.”

Low fat and no fat milk products often include milk solids that contain MSG.  Low fat and no fat versions of ice cream and cheese may not be as obvious as yogurt, milk, cream, cream cheese, cottage cheese, etc., but they are not an exception.

Protein powders contain glutamic acid, which, invariably, would be precessed free glutamic acid (MSG).  Glutamic acid is not always named on labels of protein powders.

Drinks, candy, and chewing gum are potential sources of hidden MSG and of aspartame and neotame. Aspartic acid, found in neotame and aspartame (NutraSweet), ordinarily causes MSG type reactions in MSG sensitive people. Aspartame is found in some medications, including children’s medications. Neotame is relatively new and we have not yet seen it used widely. Check with your pharmacist.

Binders and fillers for medications, nutrients, and supplements, both prescription and non-prescription, enteral feeding materials, and some fluids administered intravenously in hospitals, may contain MSG.

According to the manufacturer, Varivax–Merck chicken pox vaccine (Varicella Virus Live), contains L-monosodium glutamate and hydrolyzed gelatin both of which contain processed free glutamic acid (MSG) which causes brain lesions in young laboratory animals, and causes endocrine disturbances like OBESITY and REPRODUCTIVE disorders later in life. It would appear that most, if not all, live virus vaccines contain MSG.

Reactions to MSG are dose related, i.e., some people react to even very small amounts. MSG-induced reactions may occur immediately after ingestion or after as much as 48 hours.

Note: There are additional ingredients that appear to cause MSG reactions in ACUTELY sensitive people. A list is available by request.

Remember: By FDA definition, all MSG is “naturally occurring.” “Natural” doesn’t mean “safe.”  “Natural” only means that the ingredient started out in nature.

Fort Detrick disease samples may be missing

Standard

Here is the link: http://www.fredericknewspost.com/sections/news/display.htm?StoryID=89293

This is not good.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090426/hl_nm/us_flu